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Regular version of the site

Scientific Programme

Keynote Speakers

 

Evelina Fedorenko
Prof. Evelina Fedorenko

 

Assistant Professor
MIT


Title:
The language system in the human mind and brain

Abstract:

Human language surpasses all other animal communication systems in its complexity and generative power. My lab uses a combination of behavioral, brain imaging, and computational approaches to illuminate the functional architecture of language, with the ultimate goal of deciphering the representations and computations that enable us to understand and produce language.

I will discuss three discoveries my lab has made over the last decade. First, I will show that the language network is selective for language processing over a wide range of non-linguistic processes that have been argued to share computational demands with language, including arithmetic, executive functions, music, and action/gesture observation. Next, I will consider the distinction between the lexicon (word meanings) and syntax (the rules for how individual words can combine to create phrases and sentences). Much prior theorizing and empirical work has focused on syntax, and most current proposals of the neural architecture of language argue that syntax is cognitively and neurally dissociable from meaning. I will challenge this view. In particular, I will show that syntactic processing is not localized to a particular region within the language network, and that every brain region that responds to syntactic processing is at least as sensitive to word meanings, including when probed with a high-spatial/high-temporal-resolution method (ECoG). Further, many brain regions show stronger responses to word meanings than to syntactic manipulations, with no regions showing the opposite preference. Finally, I will provide evidence that stimuli that are not syntactically well-formed but allow for meaning composition (operationalized within an information-theoretic framework) elicit as strong a response as intact sentences, suggesting that semantic composition may be the core driver of the response in the language-selective brain regions. Taken together, these results argue against an abstract and domain-general syntactic processing mechanism, and support strong integration between the lexicon and syntax. They further suggest that the language network is more concerned with meaning than structure, in line with the primary function of language – to share meanings across minds.


Antje S. Meyer

Antje S. Meyer

Professor at Radboud University and a director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 
Title: Why conversations are easy to hold and hard to study
 
Antje S. Meyer and Suzanne Jongman, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen The Netherlands

Abstract:

Everyday conversation is characterized by smooth turn-taking, i.e. short gaps and frequent overlaps between turns. Switching quickly between the tasks of listening and speaking, and planning one's turn during an interlocutor's utterance should render conversation a taxing task. Yet, it is not commonly experienced as such. Why is this? We review evidence showing that (a) in everyday conversations and in dyadic laboratory tasks, speakers indeed often plan their utterances while listening to their interlocutors; (b) listening and speaking require attention in multiple ways; (c) listening and speaking interfere with each other. All of this should make holding a conversation hard. However, we also discuss that (d) speaking and listening, only require part, but not require all of a person's attention; and that (e) listening and speaking may not only interfere with each other, but can also facilitate each other. Most importantly, we argue that (f) the capacity demands imposed by speaking and listening are largely strategic rather than structural, and that in everyday conversation, speakers are free to allocate capacity to these activities as they see fit. Finally, we argue that (g) in everyday conversation, speakers are free to choose when to talk and what  to say (if anything). This contrasts sharply with the tight task constraints in most laboratory sets. It is this mundane freedom of speech takes makes everyday conversations easy to hold but hard to study.


Linda Wheeldon
Prof. Wheeldon

Professor
Department of Foreign Languages and Translation, University of Agder

Title: Spoken sentence production: incremental planning for fluent output

Abstract:
Speaking is a demanding task involving several stages in which linguistic representations must be retrieved and structures must be generated in order to convey our thoughts.  Put simply, speakers need to select appropriate words and articulate them in the correct order, ideally in a timely and a fluent manner. There is now a great deal of evidence that we plan our utterances incrementally, initiating the articulation of early parts of an utterance and planning the rest as we speak. Investigating the nature of the planning increments employed during fluent sentence production can provide a great deal of information about speech production processes as well as the factors that constrain them: in particular information about the relationship between words and structure. According to some theories, syntactic planning is controlled by processes responsible for the retrieval of words. Alternatively, syntactic structure may be generated independently of lexical access and may even function to constrain it. Moreover, at the interface with sound structure, we can generate representations that correspond to neither lexical nor grammatical units. I will review research that has focused on planning scope during the production of fluent sentences. I will consider to what extent planning scope is determined by linguistic structures and to what extent it is flexible and subject to cognitive constraints, as well as whether the answers to these questions differ for different levels of linguistic representation - grammatical, lexical and phonological. 



Christoph Scheepers

University of Glasgow

Title: What’s the syntax behind syntactic priming?

Abstract:

The tendency to repeat syntactic structure over consecutive sentence production or comprehension trials has received much attention in psycholinguistics over the past 25 years. Syntactic priming is not only informative in terms of potential cognitive architectures and mechanisms for linguistic processing, but has also (more specifically) been argued to be revealing in terms of linguistic representations (see, e.g., Branigan & Pickering, 2017). In this talk, I will review a wide range of prominent findings from the syntactic priming literature. Using Lexicalised Tree-Adjoining Grammar (cf. Joshi, 1985) as a general theoretical framework, I will argue that many – if not most – of the relevant findings in this area can be characterised in terms of basic lexical choices involving head-specific subcategorization frames or the use of different types of head-modifying adjuncts. Other types of structural priming effects concern differences in the hierarchical configuration of recursive structures and are, in a sense, more “syntactic” rather than lexical in nature. I will conclude that moving away from simple context-free grammars, and towards more recent representational formalisms, opens up new theoretical perspectives on the representations involved in syntactic priming. More generally, I will argue for a Renaissance/revival of the “linguistics” in psycholinguistics.    

Yury Shtyrov

Shtyrov

Aarhus University

Title: Neurophysiology as a precision tool for psycholinguistics: Disentangling morphosyntactic interactions using brain dynamics

Abstract: 

The debate on the nature of complex word storage and processing is ongoing. Are complex words real mental objects represented in the lexicon as such, or are they learnt, stored and processed as mere combinations of individual morphemes bound together by morphosyntactic rules? And do these mechanisms differ depending on the type of morphology under investigation? As we show in a series of studies, such questions hotly debated in (psycho)linguistic literature can be straightforwardly addressed using neurophysiology. Using MEG and EEG, we have established a distinct double dissociation pattern in neurophysiological responses to spoken language, which can reflect lexical (“representational”) vs. (morpho)syntactic (“combinatorial”) processes in the brain. These are manifest as: (1) a larger passive (i.e. obtained without any stimulus-related task) brain response to meaningful words relative to matched meaningless pseudowords, reflecting stronger activation of pre-existing lexical memory traces for monomorphemic words (= lexical ERP/ERF pattern), (2) a smaller brain response amplitude for congruous word combinations (reflecting priming via syntactic links), relative to incongruous combinations where no priming is possible (=combinatorial pattern). This double dissociation – larger response for auditorily presented simple holistic representations vs. smaller response for well-formed combinatorial sequences – allows, in turn, for clear experimental predictions. Such experiments could test the nature of morphosyntactic processing by presenting the subjects with real complex words and incongruous morpheme combinations in passive auditory event-related designs, and comparing the relative dynamics of their brain responses.

We have used this neurophysiological approach to address a range of morphosyntactic questions: neural processing of compound words, past tense inflections, particle verbs as well as differences between inflectional and derivational morphology and processes of complex word acquisition in L1 and L2.  This body of results generally supports a flexible dual-route account of complex-word processing, with a range of strategies involved dynamically, depending on exact psycholinguistic stimulus properties. Furthermore, as these experiments indicate, comprehension of spoken complex words is a largely automatized process underpinned by a very rapid (starting from ~50 ms) neural activation in bilateral perisylvian areas.


Final programme

Programme of the conference (PDF, 857 Kb) 

 

 

Posters should have a portrait (vertical) orientation and A0 size.
 
Oral presentations should last 15 minutes (+ 5 minutes for questions).

 

September 6th

9:00 – 9:30

Opening address

Vasily Klyucharev (Director of the Institute Cognitive Neuroscience, National Research University - Higher School of Economics)

9:30 –  10:30

 

Invited talk 1

Evelina Fedorenko (Harvard University and MIT, USA)

The language system in the human mind and brain”

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee break

11:00 – 11:20

 

Talk A1

 

 

Katrien Segaert & Evelien Heyselaar University of Birmingham, Radboud University

Long-term syntactic priming: Priming affects syntactic processing one week and one month post-exposure”

11:20 – 11:40

 

Talk A2

Aurélie Pistono Patrice Peran, Guerrier Laura, Rafiq Marie, Gimeno Mélanie, Bezy Catherine, Pariente Jérémie, Jucla Mélanie Ghent University, University of Toulouse II-Jean Jaurès, Toulouse University, Toulouse University Hospital

Functional organization of language networks: from rest to speech production in young and elderly participants”

11:40 – 12:00

 

Talk A3

 

Chi Zhang, Sarah Bernolet, Robert J. Hartsuiker Ghent University, University of Antwerp

The Effect of Discourse Continuity on Structural Priming”

12:00 – 12:20

 

Talk A4

 

Meilin Zhan, Roger Levy Massachusetts Institute of Technology

“Availability-based production predicts speakers' real-time choices of Mandarin classifiers

12:20 – 14:20

Lunch & Poster session 1

14:20 – 15:20

Invited talk 2

Christoph Scheepers (University of Glasgow, UK)

What’s the syntax behind syntactic priming?”

15:20 – 15:40

 

Talk B1

 

 

Anne Abeillé, Barbara Hemforth, Elodie Winckel, Edward Gibson Université Paris Diderot, MIT

Subject-island constraint? The discourse function of the construction matters”

15:40 – 16:00

Talk B2

 

 

Björn Lundquist Janne B. Johannessen, Eirik Tengesdal, Emel Türker van Der Heiden , Valantis Fyndanis, Nina Hagen Kaldhol, Yulia Rodina University of Oslo, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø,Long Island University,University of California

 

“Inter-language gender congruency has facilitative effects on L2 production and comprehension of grammatical gender, but only for highly proficient speakers

16:00 – 16:20

Talk B3

 

 

Susanne Brouwer Radboud University

The role of foreign accent and short-term exposure on speech-in-speech recognition”

16:20 – 16:40

Talk B4

 

 

Charlotte Poulisse, Katrien Segaert, Ali Mazaheri, Linda Wheeldon University of Birmingham, University of Agder

The oscillatory mechanisms supporting syntactic language comprehension in healthy aging”

 

16:40 – 17:00

 

Coffee break

 

17:00 – 17:20

Talk C1

 

 

Evgeniia Diachek, Matthew Siegelman, Idan Blank, Evelina Fedorenko; Vanderbilt University, Columbia University, UCLA, MIT

The domain-general multiple demand (MD) network does not support core aspects of sentence interpretation: a large-scale fMRI investigation”

17:20 – 17:40

Talk C2

 

 

Mieke Slim, Peter Lauwers, Rob Hartsuiker Ghent University

Priming of Logical Representations in Monolingual and Bilingual Language Comprehension”

17:40 – 18:00

Talk C3

 

 

Yuki Kamide, Anuenue Kukona; University of Dundee, De Montfort University

Prediction in sentence processing across the adult lifespan”

18:00 – 18:20

Talk C4

 

 

Maria Alexeeva, Andriy Myachykov, Beatriz Bermúdez-Margaretto, Yury Shtyrov National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Northumbria University, Aarhus University, St. Petersburg University

Syntactic priming and extralinguisitc information contribute to rapid automatic syntax parsing: ERP evidence.”

18:20 – 18:40

Talk C5

 

Gerry T. M. Altmann, Zachary Ekves; University of Connecticut, NCT Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences

“Building event representation on-the-fly: A new account of event cognition

 

18:40 – 20:00

 

Reception & Poster session 2

 

 

September 7th

 

 

9:00 – 9:30

HSE address

Vadim Radaev (Vice Chancellor, HSE)

9:30 – 10:30

Invited talk 3

Linda Wheeldon (Agder University, Norway)

Spoken sentence production: incremental planning for fluent output”

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee break

11:00 – 11:20

Talk D1

Phillip M. Alday, Antje S. Meyer Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Radboud University

 “Conversation as a competitive sport”

11:20 – 11:40

 

Talk D2

 

 

Nikolay Korotaev, Andrej A. Kibrik Olga Fedorova  Russian State University for the Humanities, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Institute of Linguistics RAS,

On temporal alignment between speech and manual gesticulation: two levels of coordination”

11:40 – 12:00

 

Talk D3

 

Anna A. Ivanova, Nikolay Korotaev, Olga Fedorova MIT, Russian State University for the Humanities, Lomonosov Moscow State University

The language network is recruited but not required for non-verbal semantic processing”

12:00 – 12:20

 

Talk D4

 

Maxim Ulanov, Yury Shtyrov, Olga Dragoy, Svetlana Malyutina, Anna Pavlova, Ekaterina Iskra, Olga Soloukhina, Olga Buivolova, Vidya Somashekarappa, Andrey Prokofyev, Matteo Feurra, Tatiana Stroganova; National Research University - Higher School of Economics

Intensive language-action therapy combined with anodal tDCS leads to verb generation improvements in chronic non-fluent post-stroke aphasia”

12:20– 12:40

 

Talk D5

 

Ágnes Lukács, Dorottya Dobó, Ágnes Szőllősi, Kornél Németh, Krisztina Sára Lukics; Budapest University of Technology and Economics, MTA-BME Lendület Language Acquisition Research Group Hungarian Academy of Sciences

“Segmentation impairment in dyslexia across modalities and domains: online and offline measures

 

12:40 – 14:30

 

Lunch & Poster session 3

 

14:30 – 15:30

Invited talk 4

Antje Meyer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands and Radboud University, The Netherlands)

Why conversations are easy to hold and hard to study”

15:40 – 16:00

Talk E1

 

Natalia Mitrofanova, Marit Westergaard UiT The Arctic University of Norway, NTNU

Typological or structural transfer in L3 acquisition: Evidence from artificial language learning”

16:00 – 16:20

Talk E2

 

Silvia Kim, Elsi Kaiser University of Southern California

English-Korean code-switching: Looking beyond balanced bilinguals and beyond Indo-European”

16:20 – 16:40

Talk E3

 

Kalinka Timmer, Albert Costa Universitat Pompeu Fabra

How does language context modulate attention?”

16:40 – 17:00

Coffee break

17:00 – 17:20

Talk E4

 

Iva Ivanova, Dacia Hernandez, Aziz Atiya University of Texas at El Paso

Lexical alignment in the two languages of bilinguals”

17:20 – 17:40

Talk E5

 

Douglas Roland; Waseda University

“Relative Processing by L2 speakers of English

17:40 – 18:00

Talk E6

 

Wilhelmiina Toivo, Christoph Scheepers; University of Glasgow

Comparing methods of measuring reduced emotional resonance in bilinguals' second language”

19:00 - …

Boat Tour and Conference Dinner

         

 

 

September 8th

 

10:00– 11:00

Invited talk 5

Yury Shtyrov (Aarhus University, Denmark; National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Russia; SPBU, Russia)

Neurophysiology as a precision tool for psycholinguistics: Disentangling morphosyntactic interactions using brain dynamics”

11:00– 11:20

Coffee break

11:20 – 11:40

Talk F1

 

Anna Laurinavichyute, Anastasia Kromina, Anastasiya Lopukhina National Research University - Higher School of Economics, University of Potsdam

Eye-movement control in the Visual World Paradigm”

11:40 – 12:00

Talk F2

 

Vera Kempe, Glenn P. Williams, Nikolay Panayotov Abertay University

Does dialect exposure impair literacy acquisition?”

12:00 – 12:20

Talk F3

 

Mireia Marimon, Thierry Nazzi, Barbara Höhle; University of Potsdam, University Paris Descartes

Word segmentation cues in French- and German-learning infants”

12:20 – 12:40

Talk F4

 

Yevgen Matusevych, Thomas Schatz, Sharon Goldwater, Naomi Feldman; University of Edinburgh, University of Maryland

Continuous representations can support early phonetic learning”

12:40 – 13:00

Talk F5

 

Alina Leminen, Eino Partanen, Andreas Højlund Nielsen, Mikkel Wallentin, Yury Shtyrov; University of Helsinki, Aarhus University

Online build-up of neocortical memory traces for spoken words is facilitated by novel semantic associations: MEG data”

13:00 – 14:00

Lunch

14:00 – 14:20

Talk G1

 

Marta Tagliani University of Verona

The saliency of the mentioned argument facilitates the processing of negation: a Visual World study”

14:20 – 14:40

Talk G2

 

Amélie la Roi University of Groningen

Using idioms to study the effects of cognitive ageing on language processing: An ERP study”

14:40 – 15:00

Talk G3

 

Filip Smolík, Czech Academy of Sciences

Lemma frequency, form frequency and imageability in speeded inflection production”

15:00 – 15:20

Talk G4

 

Shinri Ohta, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz; Kyushu University, Waseda University, New York University

“Dissociating the effects of morphemes and letters in visual word recognition: An MEG study of Japanese verbs

 

15:20 – 15:40

 

Closing remarks

 

 

16:00 - …

 

Sightseeing tours

 

       

 

Posters session A: 12:20 – 14:20, 6th September

A01_ Are pragmatic inferences triggered by informationally redundant utterances effortless?
Margarita Ryzhova1, Vera Demberg1; 1Saarland University

A02_ Immature mismatch responses to lexical tones in Mandarin children with specific language impairment
Ying-Ying Cheng1, Hsin-Chi Wu2, Hsin-Yi Shih1, Pei-Wen Yeh3, Huei-Ling Yen4, Chia-Ying Lee1,3,5; 1Academia Sinica, 2Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, 3National Chengchi University, 4Tamkang University, 5National Central University

A03_ It doesn’t matter who you are, I still don’t believe you: Disfluency and deception in native and non-native speakers.
Esperanza Badaya1, Martin Corley1; 1The University of Edinburgh

A04_ Avoiding ambiguous pronouns: A cross-linguistic study
Kumiko Fukumura1; Sandra Villata2, Francesca Foppolo3, Céline Pozniak1,F.-Xavier Alario4; 1University of Stirling, 2 University of Connecticut, 3 University of Milano- Bicocca,4 Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS   

A05_ Antilocality effects in main clauses: Evidence from Basque
Sergio López-Sancio1, Idoia Ros2, Itziar Laka1; 1University of the Basque Country, 2Independent researcher

A06_ Distinct production and neural activity for L2 stem gradation in beginning L2 learners than in advanced learners and native speakers.
Laura A. Hedlund 1, 3, Patrik Wikman1, Suzanne C.A. Hut1,4, Tatu Huovilainen1, Teija Kujala1, Alina Leminen1,2,3; 1University of Helsinki, 2Aalto University, 3University Medical Centre Utrecht

A07_ Proficiency matters: Bilingual experience affects the executive function and its cortical network
Federico Gallo1,2, Nikolay Novitskiy3, Andriy Myachykov1,4, Yury Shtyrov1,5,6; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 3The Chinese University of Hong-Kong, 4Northumbria University, 5Aarhus University, 6St. Petersburg University

A08_ Emotional processing of ironic vs. literal criticism in adults with and without autism spectrum disorder: Evidence from eye-tracking
Mahsa Mirza Hossein Barzy1, David Williams1, Ruth Filik2, Heather J Ferguson1; 1University of Kent, 2University of Nottingham

A09_ Processing grammatical ambiguity in spontaneous Russian: Pilot experimental evidence
Elena Riekhakaynen1, Aleksandr Smirnov1; 1Saint-Petersburg State University

A10_ Causation types in bump alternation in Japanese -from data of self-paced reading studies
Natsuno Aoki1, Kentaro Nakatani1; 1Konan University

A11_ The effect of linguistic bias on prediction over time
Eunjin Chun1, Joshua Daniels2, Mitchell Tozian2, Edith Kaan2; 1The Hong Kong Polytechnic University 2University of Florida

A12_ Lexical Processing of Affective Russian Nouns: evidence from yes/no and go/no-go lexical decision task
Vlasov Mikhail1,2, Sychev Oleg1; 1Shukshin Altai State University for Humanities and Pedagogy, 2Tomsk State University

A13_ Word order preference in the processing of Korean sentences comprehension with multiple adverbial phrases
Jewook, Yoo1, Yunju, Nam1, Sookeong Kim, Upyoung, Hong1; 1Konkuk university

A14_ Word properties over experience-related factors: Investigating the masked translation priming asymmetry
Adel Chaouch-Orozco1, Jorge González Alonso2, Jason Rothman2,3; 1University of Reading, 2The Arctic University of Norway, 3Universidad Nebrija

A15_ Timing of application of bilingual inhibitory control
Iva Ivanova1; 1University of Texas at El Paso

A16_ Frequency and predictability effects in natural reading by simultaneously recording the eye movement and ERPs
Chia-Ying Lee1, Yu-Lin Tzeng1, Chun-hsien Hsu2, Jie-li Tsai; 1Academia Sinica, 2National Central University

A17_ Planning of phrasal pitch: a comparative eye-tracking study with English and Estonian speakers
Nele Ots1, Agnieszka Konopka1,2; 1Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, 2University of Aberdeen

A18_ Sense of agency is flexible during speech production with altered auditory feedback
Matthias Franken1, Robert Hartsuiker1, Petter Johansson2, Lars Hall2, Andreas Lind1,2; 1Ghent University, 2Lund University

A19_ The Relationship between Bilingual Experience and Gyrification across the Adult Lifespan: A Surface-Based Morphometry Study
Nicola Del Maschio1, Davide Fedeli1, Simone Sulpizio1, Jubin Abutalebi1; 1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University

A20_ Speaker modelling in language comprehension: The role of linguistic competence
Zhenguang Cai1; 1The Chinese University of Hong Kong

A21_ Saliency and frequency in the L1 acquisition of Russian nominal morphology: 30-59 months old children
Natalia Maltseva1, Anastasia Stoops2, Kiel Christianson2; 1National Research Saratov State University, 2University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

A22_ Is the VSO word order canonical in Arabic? An ERP study
Ali Idrissi1, Eiman Mustafawi1, Tariq Khuwaileh1, R. Muralikrishnan2; 1Qatar University, 2Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics

A23_ Humanness rather than morphology explains noun-adjective agreement patterns in Arabic
R. Muralikrishnan1, Eiman Mustafawi2, Tariq Khuwaileh2, Ali Idrissi2; 1Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, 2Qatar University

A24_ Antecedent retrieval during the processing of Dutch reciprocal pronouns
Anna Giskes1, Dave Kush1; 1Norwegian University for Science and Technology

A25_ The role of the decision stage in the recognition of reduced speech
Malte C. Viebahn1, Paul A. Luce2; 1University of Leipzig, 2University at Buffalo

A26_ Task-dependent effects in the lexical boost
Laura Wakeford1, Leila Kantola2, Roger Van Gompel1; 1University of Dundee, 2Umeå University

A27_ A Perceptually-constrained Visual Word Recognition Model
Raquel G. Alhama1, Noam Siegelman2, Ram Frost3, Blair C. Armstrong4; 1Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 2Haskins Laboratories, 3The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 4University of Toronto

A28_ Cross-Linguistic Homophone Auditory Recognition
Youtao Lu1, James Morgan1; 1Brown University

A29_ Morphological processing of nominal inflection: gender and number processing on behavioral and electroencephalographic data
Estivalet, Gustavo Lopez1, Ferrari-Neto, Jose1, Meunier, Fanny2; 1Federal University of Paraiba, 2University of Nice Sophia Antipolis

A30_ How the Age Affect Global and Local Context Effects: Constraint and Cloze Probability Effects on Chinese Classifier-Noun Agreement
Chia-Ju, Chou1, Chia-Ying Lee2; 1National Yang-Ming University, 2Academia Sinica

A31_ Representation of T3 sandhi in Mandarin: Significance of context
Yaxuan Meng1, Hilary Wynne1, Aditi Lahiri1; 1University of Oxford

A32_ Associative acquisition of action word meaning leads to activation of perisylvian speech-related areas time-locked to action initiation
Boris Chernyshev1,2,3, Anna Butorina1, Anastasia Nikolaeva1, Andrey Prokofyev1, Tatiana Stroganova1; 1Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics,3Lomonosov Moscow State University

A33_ Segmentation of transparent and opaque compounds for poor readers
Sandra Pappert1, Bettina M. Bock2; 1Heidelberg University; 2University of Cologne

A34_ Effortful verb retrieval from semantic memory drives beta suppression in higher-order motor areas
Anna Pavlova1,2, Anna Butorina1, Anastasia Nikolaeva1, Andrey Prokofyev1, Maxim Ulanov1, Denis Bondarev1, Tatiana Stroganova1; 1Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, 2National Research University Higher School of Economics

A35_ Mechanisms of response inhibition are involved in the processing of sentential negation. Evidence from EEG theta and beta rhythms.
Enrique García-Marco1,2, Yurena Morera1, Manuel de Vega1, David Beltrán1; 1Universidad de La Laguna, 2Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia

A36_ Ellipsis and the QuD: evidence from sluicing with nominal antecedents
Till Poppels1, Andrew Kehler1; 1University of California

A37_ Phonological/Orthographic Facilitation and Phonological/Orthographic Inhibition in Spoken/Written Word Production: Evidence from a Chinese Blocked Cyclic Task
Qingqing Qu1,2, Chen Feng1,2, Markus F. Damian3; 1Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3University of Bristol

A38_ Association of Functional Connectivity in the Right Superior Temporal Gyrus with Compensation of Speech Impairment in Fluent Aphasia
Olga Martynova1,2, Vladislav Balaev1; 1Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology of RAS, 2National Research University Higher School of Economics

A39_ Two closely related languages and L1 attrition & L2 acquisition: Slovaks in Czechia
Adam Kříž1; 1Charles University in Prague

A40_ Morphosyntactic prediction during reading in Russian
Anastasiya Lopukhina1, Anna Laurinavichyute1,2, Konstantin Lopukhin3; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2University of Potsdam, 3Scrapinghub

A41_ Temporo-frontal cortical networks for automatic visual word recognition: a vMMN study
Francesca Carota1, Clare Cook2, Lucy MacGregor2, Yury Shtyrov3,4; 1Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 2Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 3Aarhus University, 4National Research University - Higher School of Economics

A42_ Cross-domain Visuospatial Processing of Affective Valence and Abstract Magnitude
Katie Trueman1, Andriy Myachykov1,2; 1Northumbria University, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics

A44_ Bilingual Experience Changes Concept Associations
Siqi Ning1, James Bartolotti1, Viorica Marian1; 1Northwestern University

A44_ Differences in processing of polysemous and homonymous words: an ERP study in Russian
Anna Yurchenko1,2, Anastasiya Lopukhina1,3, Olga Dragoy1,4; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2Epilepsy Center, 3Russian Academy of Sciences, 4Federal Center for Cerebrovascular Pathology and Stroke

A45_ Brain Dynamics of Rapid Word Learning with and without Semantic Reference: EEG Investigation
Beatriz Bermúdez-Margaretto1, Lilli Kimppa2, Yury Shtyrov3; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2University of Helsinki, 3Aarhus University

A46_ Tense and number agreement in agrammatic and anomic patients
Beatriz Bermúdez-Margaretto1, Carlos J. Álvarez2, Alberto Domínguez2; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2University of La Laguna

A47_ Neurophysiology of concrete vs. abstract concept acquisition: EEG evidence of concreteness effect
Nadezhda Mkrtychian1, Evgeny Blagovechtchenski1, Daria Gnedykh1, Diana Kurmakaeva1, Svetlana Kostromina1, Yury Shtyrov1,2,3; 1St. Petersburg State University, 2Aarhus University, 3National Research University - Higher School of Economics

A48_ Transposed-letter similarity effects in Russian when primes and targets are of different frequency
Svetlana Alexeeva1, Natalia Slioussar2; 1St. Petersburg State University, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics

A49_ EEG study on the Misinformation effect
Lylia Mikhailova1, Yury Shtyrov1,2, Andriy Myachykov1,3, Maksim Kapitsin1, Seungah Lee1, Beatriz Martín-Luengo1; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2Aarhus University, 3Northumbria University

A50_ Erroneous processing of garden-path sentences in Czech
Jan Chromý1; 1Charles University

A51_ Event perception and description are embodied: An eye-tracking study in Japanese sentence production
Manami Sato1, Keiyu Niikuni2, Amy J. Schafer3, Masatoshi Koizumi2; 1Okinawa International University, 2Tohoku University, 3University of Hawaii

A52_ The effect of the learning context on novel word learning
Maria Korochkina1,2,3, Audrey Bürki2, Lyndsey Nickels3; 1University of Groningen, 2University of Potsdam, 3Macquarie University

A53_ Age-related disruption in the use of lexical information in sentence production, despite preserved syntactic planning
Sophie M. Hardy1, Katrien Segaert1, Linda Wheeldon2; 1University of Birmingham, 2University of Agder

A54_ The production of Object Relative clauses in Italian-speaking children: a syntactic priming study
Carla Contemori1, Claudia Manetti2; 1University of Texas at El Paso, 2University of Siena

A55_ How do dialogue partners jointly manage mental load to navigate the interaction?
Dominique Knutsen1, Gilles Col2, Angèle Brunellière1; 1Université de Lille, 2Université de Poitiers

A56_ Effects of lexical frequency and compositionality on phonological reduction in English compounds
Forrest Davis1, Abigail C Cohn1; 1Cornell University

A57_ Rapid semantic prediction in the developing brain
Ruth Kessler1, Claudia K. Friedrich1; 1University Tuebingen

A58_ The role of inhibition in inflectional encoding: Producing the past tense
João Pedro Santos Ferreira1, Ardi Roelofs1, Vitória Piai1; 1Radboud University

A59_ Early pseudohomophone and orthographic priming during reading in Russian
Olga Pakholiuk1, Silke Hamann1, Paul Boersma1; 1The University of Amsterdam

A60_ Syntax and Prosody in Encoding Information Structure in Russian: an Experimental Study
Sofiya Popova1, Natalia Slioussar2; 1Saint-Petersburg State University, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics

A61_ Individual differences in focus processing
Chao Sun1, Xaver Koch1, Katharina Spalek1, 1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

A62_ Infant speech sound acquisition as error-driven discriminative learning of the speech signal
Jessie S. Nixon1, Fabian Tomaschek1; 1University of Tübingen

A63_ Resolving German demonstrative pronouns through prominence among three antecedents
Clare Patterson1, Petra B. Schumacher1; 1University of Cologne

A64_ How three types of pronouns influence story progression
Melanie Fuchs1, Petra B. Schumacher1; 1University of Cologne

A65_ Focus alternatives in language production: evidence from lexical decision
Beate Bergmann1, Katharina Spalek1; 1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

A66_ Incrementality in the processing of adverbial order variations
Larissa Specht1, Britta Stolterfoht1; 1Tübingen University

A67_ Modeling misretrieval and feature substitution in agreement attraction
Dario Paape1, Serine Avetisyan1, Sol Lago2, Shravan Vasishth1; 1University of Potsdam, 2Goethe University Frankfurt

A68_ Quantifications of morphological family size: combining word-embeddings with lexical decision in Russian
Daniil Gnetov1, Aki-Juhani Kyröläinen2,3; 1Tomsk State University, 2McMaster University, 3Brock University

A69_ The effects of cross-script semantic representations in Sino-Korean
Yoolim Kim1, Aditi Lahiri1, and Sandra Kotzor1; 1University of Oxford

Posters session B: 18:20 – 20h, 6th September

B01_ Good-enough processing in adolescents and adults under no-noise and auditory-noise conditions
Anastasiya Lopukhina
1, Anna Laurinavichyute1,2, Svetlana Malyutina1; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2University of Potsdam

B02_ Early Language Development After Unilateral Ischemic Stroke
Daria Zubova1, Ekaterina Suleymanova1, Olga Lvova1,2, Alexander Kotyusov.1; 1Ural Federal University, 2Ural State Medical University

B03_ Eye movements during connected-speech production: effects of lexical and grammatical selection
Aurélie Pistono1, Robert J. Hartsuiker1; 1Ghent University

B04_ Integration of tense, aspect and biographical knowledge during language processing
Daniela Palleschi1,2, Camilo Rodríguez Ronderos1, Pia Knoeferle1,2; 1Institut für deutsche Sprache und Linguistik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 2Einstein Center for Neurosciences Berlin

B05_ Neural processing of taboo words: A functional imaging study in native and foreign language speakers
Simone Sulpizio1, Michelle Toti1,2,3, Nicola Del Maschio, Albert Costa, Davide Fedeli, Remo Job, Jubin Abutalebi; 1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 2Pompeu Fabra University, 3University of Trento

B06_ What ERPs (do and do not) tell us about language retrieval difficulty in bilingual language production
Zofia Wodniecka1, Jakub Szewczyk1, Patrycja Kałamała1, Paweł Mandera1, Joanna Durlik1; 1Jagiellonian University

B07_ Structure prediction in Chinese sentence comprehension: Evidence from the verb bias effect in a visual-world structural priming paradigm
Xuemei Chen1, Robert Hartsuiker1; 1University of Ghent

B08_ Can local coherence effects lead to illusions of grammaticality?
Dario Paape1, Shravan Vasishth1, Ralf Engbert1; 1University of Potsdam

B09_ How does redundancy affect referent identification? A visual-world eye-tracking study
Kumiko Fukumura1, Maria Nella Carminati1; 1University of Stirling

B10_ Executive Functioning and Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution: No Evidence for Conflict Adaptation Effects
Emma Leone1, Edith Kaan1, Yucheng Liu1; 1University of Florida

B11_ Experimental L2 Semantics/Pragmatics of Scalar Implicature: An ERP Study
Euiyon Cho1, Myung-Kwan Park1, Wonil Chung1; 1Dongguk University

B12_ Distinguishing between intuition and hypothesis testing in phonological learning
Katya Pertsova1, Elliott Moreton1; 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

B13_ Garden-path misinterpretation in reading while listening
Guorong Zhang1, E. Matthew Husband1; 1University of Oxford

B14_ Parafoveal processing of morphology in reading Russian: a case of Russian native speakers and Tatar-Russian bilinguals
Daniil Gnetov1, Timur Mashanlo1, Seppo Vainio2, Jukka Hyönä2; 1Tomsk State University, 2University of Turku

B15_ The processing of diacritics in Arabic visual word recognition: An ERP study
Ali Idrissi1, R. Muralikrishnan2, Tariq Khwaileh1, Eiman Mustafawi1, John Drury1; 1Qatar University, 2Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics

B16_ A Constructional Account of Word Formation in Persian: Evidence from Compounding
Ali Safari1; 1Hazrat Masumeh University

B17_ How Two Morphological Systems Shape Processing of ACC Case in Bilingual Children
Natalia Meir1, Olga Parshina2, Irina A. Sekerina2; 1Bar-Ilan University, 2CUNY

B19_ Interrogative extraction from nominal copular sentences: a SPR study
Paolo Lorusso1, Matteo Greco1, Cristiano Chesi1, Andrea Moro1; 1IUSS Scuola Universitaria Superiore Pavia

B20_ Syntactic priming of sentence production in Czech: testing the effects of verb and case suffix overlap
Filip Smolík1, Maroš Filip2; 1Institute of Psychology CAS, 2Charles University

B21_ Pronoun comprehension biases adapt to referential frequencies in context
Jennifer E. Arnold1, Elyce Williams1; 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

B22_ Revising reading-related neural mechanisms with a natural reading approach
Tatu Huovilainen1, Eetu Sjöblom1, Miika Leminen2, Yury Shtyrov3, Teija Kujala1, Alina Leminen1; 1University of Helsinki, 2Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, 3Aarhus University

B23_ Does interactional context modulate conflict resolution? Evidence from oculomotor Stroop task
Riya Rafeekh1, Ramesh Kumar Mishra1; 1University of Hyderabad

B24_ Bilingual Difficulties in Lexical access: What can we learn from the cost of language shifting?
Hamutal Kreiner1, Tamar Degani2, Haya Ataria2, Farha Khateeb2; 1Ruppin Academic Center, 2University of Haifa

B25_ An fMRI study of case agreement processing in Russian
Natalia Slioussar1,2, Maxim Kireev3,2, Alexander Korotkov3, Svyatoslav Medvedev3; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2St.Petersburg U, 3IHB RAS

B26_ Working Memory and Language Proficiency in EFL Learners’ Attachment Ambiguity Resolution
Yanan Sheng1, Xiaomei Qiao1; 1Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

B27_ Lexically partitioning the colour space for efficient communication
Asad Sayeed1, Mikael Kågebäck2, Devdatt Dubhashi2; 1University of Gothenburg, 2Chalmers University of Technology

B28_ Implication of directional processing of Catenators
Gautam Sengupta1, Sreerakuvandana1; 1University of Hyderabad

 

B29_ Processing reduced word forms: From psycholinguistic evidence to algorithmization
Korobeynikova Irina1, Riekhakaynen Elena1, Ventsov Anatoly1; 1Saint-Petersburg State University

B30_ Language-Specific Morphology Facilitates Predictive Use of Case Marking in Bilingual Children
Natalia Mitrofanova1, Irina A. Sekerina2, Antje Sauermann3, Natalia Gagarina4, Marit Westergaard1; 1UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 2CUNY, 3Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, 4Leibniz-ZAS

B31_ Comparing the production mechanism across interpreting types using priming paradigm
Qianxi Lv1,2, Junying Liang1, Martin Pickering2; 1Zhejiang University, 2University of Edinburgh

B32_ Semantic training facilitates the acquisition of novel morphemes: MEG evidence
Viktória Roxána Balla1, Yury Shtyrov2,3,4, Miika Leminen5, Alina Leminen1; 1University of Helsinki2Aarhus University, 3Saint Petersburg State University, 4National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 5HUS Helsinki University Hospital

B33_ The Effect of Phonological Ambiguity of Gender Morphemes on Anticipatory Eye Movements in Russian Native Speakers – a Visual World Study
Alena Kirova1, Yury Shtyrov2, Andriy Myachikov3, Nikolay Dagaev4; 1Youngstown State University, 2Aarhus University, 3Northumbria University, 4National Research University - Higher School of Economics

B34_ Competing models of retrieval in sentence processing: the case of aphasia
Paula Lisson1, Mick van het Nederend2, Dorothea Pregla1, Shravan Vasishth1, Bruno Nicenboim1, Dario Paape1; 1University of Potsdam, 2University of Utrecht

B35_ Effects of discourse status, representational complexity, and locality on object-extracted relative clause processing
Cindy Chiang1, Yijing Lu1, Elsi Kaiser1; 1University of Southern California

B36_ Retrieving Semantic Content in Online Processing: Case Study of Presupposition
Jan Winkowski1, Rick Nouwen1, Jakub Dotlačil2; 1UiL OTS Utrecht University, 2ILLC University of Amsterdam

B37_ Does age or intelligence influence adults’ second language learning in visual contexts?
Huong Thi Thu Nguyen1, Katja Münster1, Carsten Schliewe1, Pia Knoeferle1; 1Humboldt University of Berlin

B38_ On the difficulties of processing nominal compounds: Evidences from eye-tracking study
John Cristian Borges Gamboa1, Leigh Fernandez1, Shanley Allen1; 1University of Kaiserslautern

B39_ Variation in French partial interrogatives: social meaning tells us what?
Gabriel Thiberge1, Barbara Hemforth1,2; 1Laboratoire de Linguistique Formelle, University of Paris-Diderot, 2CNRS

B40_ The role of attention in visual language information processing
Julia Lamekina1, Yury Shtyrov1,2, Andriy Myachykov1,3, Sara Liljander4; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2Aarhus University, 3Northumbria University, 4Aalto University

B41_ An ERP study of time reference and tense in Arabic
R.Muralikrishnan1, Tariq Khwaileh2, Eiman Mustafawi 2, Ali Idrissi2; 1Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, 2Qatar University

B42_ The role of contextual predictability in the word processing during reading
Veronika Prokopenya1, Alisa Zhukova1; 1Saint Petersburg State University

B43_ Relative clauses in French Sign Language – an eye-tracking study
Charlotte Hauser1,2, Céline Pozniak1,3; 1Université de Paris, 2École Normale Supérieure, 3Stirling Univeristy

B44_ The Influence of Verb Bias on Online Mandarin Subjective Relative Clause (SRC) processing: an ERP study
Jou-An Chung1, Chia-Ying Lee1; 1Academia Sinica

B45_ Closest or Highest Conjunct agreement? Evidence from French
Aixiu An1, Anne Abeillé1; 1Université Paris Diderot

B46_ Discourse conditions on Verb Phrase Ellipsis and the question of syntactic identity: new evidence from acceptability experiments
Philip Miller1, Barbara Hemforth1,2; 1Université de Paris, 2CNRS

B47_ Comprehenders aggregate over speakers when adapting to the noise in the input
Rachel Ryskin1, Richard Futrell2, Swathi Kiran3, Edward Gibson1; 1Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2UC Irvine, 3Boston University

B48_ Generalizing properties based on the morphosyntax of the subject: generic and non-generic interpretations
Kim Fuellenbach1, E. Matthew Husband1, Susan Gelman2; 1University of Oxford, 2University of Michigan

B49_ The influence of cathodal and anodal tDCS of Wernicke’s area on the acquisition of novel concrete and abstract words
Diana Kurmakaeva1, Daria Gnedykh1, Nadezhda Mkrtychian1, Evgenii Blagoveschenskii1,3, Svetlana Kostromina1, Yury Shtyrov1, 2, 3; 1Saint-Petersburg University, 2Aarhus University, 3National Research University - Higher School of Economics

B50_ The use of prediction error in language learning
Vsevolod Kapatsinski1; 1University of Oregon

B51_ Enhance Metacognition through Reflective Learning
Jing Zhou1; 1Independent researcher

B52_ Syntactic and semantic contributions of pitch accents during sentence comprehension
Constantijn L van der Burght1, Angela D Friederici1, Tomás Goucha1, Gesa Hartwigsen1; 1Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

B53_ Processing cost of complement coercion in Mandarin Chinese: Evidence from a self-paced reading study
Wenting Xue1, Meichun Liu1, Stephen Politzer-Ahles2; 1City University of Hong Kong, 2The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

B54_ Traveling back in time: does switching the focus to the initial state of the changed object come at a cost?
Yanina Prystauka1, Gerry Altmann1; 1University of Connecticut

B55_ Contrasting Cross-linguistic Effects of Semantic Transparency: Evidence from Cantonese and Farsi Compounds
Mohammad Momenian1, Shuk Ka Cham1, Jafar Mohammadamini2, Eva Wittenberg3, Brendan Weekes1, William Marslen-Wilson4; 1University of Hong Kong, 2Tarbiat Modares University, 3University of California, 4University of Cambridge

B56_ Syntactically-mismatched questions are easy to sluice if you know how
Till Poppels1, Andrew Kehler1; 1University of California, San Diego

B57_ Antecedent animacy in pronoun resolution: differences between European and Brazilian Portuguese
Sara Matias Morgado1, Maria Lobo1, Paula Luegi2; 1NOVA-FCSH CLUNL, 2University of Lisbon - CLUL

B58_ Perceptual priming and syntactic choice in Russian language: Multimodal study.
Mikhail Pokhoday1, Yury Shtyrov2, Andriy Myachykov3; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2Aarhus University, 3Northumbria University

B59_ Automatic and rapid access to L1 and L2 lexicons in bilinguals: Evidence from ERPs
Anna Petrova1, Nikolay Novitskiy2, Andriy Myachykov1,3, Yury Shtyrov1,4; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Northumbria University, 4Aarhus University

B60_ Metacognitive monitoring on future performance: an ERP study
Beatriz Martín-Luengo1, Seungah Lee1, Lylia Mikhailova1, Maksim Kapitsin1, Andriy Myachykov1,2, Yury Shtyrov1,3; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2Northumbria University, 3Aarhus University

B61_ The nature of the homophone boost in structural priming in language production: Evidence from Chinese
Zhenguang Cai1, Mengxing Wang2, Ruiming Wang2, Zhenguang Cai1; 1The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2South China Normal University

B62_ Interlingual Homographs as semantic primes in sentence contexts: does prime duration matter?
Nikki Dean Marshall1, Anna Maria Di Betta1, Jane Morgan1, David Playfoot2; 1Sheffield Hallam University, 2Swansea University

B63_ Structural priming affects the comprehension of the passive voice in German-speaking adults - eye tracking data
Nenad Jovanovic1; 1University of Potsdam

B64_ Full Transfer and retraction in L2: Evidence from Norwegian-English bilinguals
Dave Kush1, Anne Dahl1; 1NTNU

B65_ Neural bases of statistical learning in artificial language
Ordin Mikhail1, Leona Polyanskaya1, David Soto1; 1BCBL

B66_ Evidence against preserved syntactic comprehension in healthy aging
Charlotte Poulisse1, Katrien Segaert1, Linda Wheeldon2; 1University of Birmingham2, University of Agder

B67_ Incidental learning of irrelevant information during reading acquisition
Jon Andoni Dunabeitia1, Aurore Zelazny2, Eloi Puig-Mayenco3, Aina Casaponsa4, Cristina Herranz5, Jason Rothman6; 1Nebrija University, 2Aalborg Universitet, 3Univeristy of Reading, 4Lancaster University, 5Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 6UiT The Arctic University of Norway

B68_ ITABOO: An Italian database for taboo words
Simone Sulpizio1, Elisa Vassallo1, Remo Job2, Jubin Abutalebi1; 1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 2University of Trento

B69_ Structural Prediction in Native and Non-Native Processing: Evidence from Russian and English
Marina Sokolova1,2; Roumyana Slabakova1,3;  1University of Southampton, 2Northwestern University, 3Norwegian University of Science and Technology

B70_ Changing comprehenders’ pronoun interpretations: immediate and cumulative priming at the discourse-level in English
Carla Contemori1; 1University of Texas at El Paso

B71_ L2 learners’ memory for newly-learned idioms and constituent words
Sara D. Beck1, Andrea Weber1; 1University of Tübingen

B72_ Language as a tool: Towards a cognitive architecture
Sylvie Saget1; 1CLASP, FLOV, University of Gothenburg

B73_ The processing of natural and grammatical gender in Hindi: An ERP study
Shikha Bhattamishra1, R. Muralikrishnan2, Kamal Kumar Choudhary1; 1Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, 2Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics

B74_ Differences in processing of Events and States
Edith Scheifele1; Linda von Sobbe1, Claudia Maienborn1; 1Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

B75_ Processing of control structures in German under cue-based retrieval
Dorothea Pregla1, Nicole Stadie1, Frank Burchert1, Shravan Vasishth1; 1University of Potsdam

B76_ Training and modality effects of artificial grammar learning across linguistic and non-linguistic domains
Ágnes Lukács1,2, Dorottya Dobó1,2, Krisztina Sára Lukics1,2; 1Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 2MTA-BME Lendület Language Acquisition Research Group

B77_ Do masculine generic pronouns cause a male bias in online processing? Evidence from eye-tracking.
Theresa Redl1,2, Peter de Swart2, Stefan Frank2, Helen de Hoop2; 1Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 2Radboud University

B78_ A cross-linguistic investigation of similarity-based interference and depth of processing in English and German
Daniela Mertzen1, Brian Dillon2, Anna Laurinavichyute1, Shravan Vasishth1; 1University of Potsdam, 2University of Massachusetts Amherst

B79_ Spanish relative clause processing: Influence of lexico-semantic information on syntactic processing
Esther Álvarez-García1, José Manuel Igoa2, Salvador Gutiérrez-Ordóñez1; 1University of León, 2Autonomous University of Madrid

B80_ Processing comparatives and superlatives – ERP studies on monotonicity effects in picture-sentence verification
Petra Augurzky1, Fabian Schlotterbeck1, Rolf Ulrich1; 1University of Tuebingen

B81_ Do we need phonemes in speech perception? An auditory selective adaptation study
Evgenii Kalenkovich1, Ekaterina Stupina1; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics

Posters session C: 12:20 – 14:20, 7th September

C01_ Locality in unbounded and local dependencies in Spanish
Sergio López-Sancio
1, Itziar Laka1; 1University of the Basque Country

C02_ Null and overt subjects pronouns in Italian and Spanish: a comparative study
Carla Contemori1, Elisa Di Domenico2; 1University of Texas at El Paso, 2Universita' per stranieri di Perugia

C03_ Oculomotor resonance during processing past and future tense in Russian and Hebrew
Nina Ladinskaya1, Anna Chrabaszcz1, Tatyana Bolgina1, Liubov Baladzhaeva3, Anna Laurinavichyute1, Anat Prior3, Valeria Tolkacheva1, Gali Yosephi3, Andriy Myachykov1,2, Olga Dragoy1,4; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2Northumbria University, 3University of Haifa, 4Federal Center for Cerebrovascular Pathology and Stroke

C04_ Processing of allomorphic and non-allomorphic verb forms in Russian. Effects of Ageing.
Kirill Elin1; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics

C05_ Inter-language gender congruency has facilitative effects on L2 production and comprehension of grammatical gender, but only for high proficient speakers
Björn Lundquist1, Janne B. Johannessen2, Eirik Tengesdal2, Emel Türker van Der Heiden2, Valantis Fyndanis3, Nina Hagen Kaldhol4, Yulia Rodina1; 1University of Tromsø, 2UiO, 3Long Island University, 4UCSD

C06_ Unaccusatives versus unergatives: ERP evidence from L1/L2 speakers of Basque
Gillén Martínez de la Hidalga1, Adam Zawiszewski1, Itziar Laka1; 1Universidad del País Vasco

C07_ Does bilingual experience facilitate novel morphology learning?
Jose Aguasvivas1, Jon Andoni Duñabeitia2, Manuel Carreiras1,3; 1BCBL, 2Universidad de Nebrija, 3Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science

C08_ Agreement attraction effects in the comprehension of grammatical sentences
Anna Laurinavichyute1,2, Titus von der Malsburg 2,3; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2University of Potsdam, 3MIT

C09_ A deeper functional explanation of island constraints
Ivan Rygaev1; 1A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems

C11_ Can nativeness, proficiency, attention and motivation account for individual differences in syntactic priming?
Marion Coumel1, Ema Ushioda1, Katherine Messenger1; 1University of Warwick

C12_ The role of case marking and word order in cross-linguistic structural priming in late L2 acquisition
Merel Muylle1, Sarah Bernolet2, Robert J. Hartsuiker1; 1Ghent University, 2University of Antwerp

C13_ Degrees of incrementality in German as a second vs first language
Sandra Pappert1, Michael Baumann2; 1Heidelberg University, 2Bielefeld University

C14_ Morphological processing across the lifespan: Evidence for dual-route processing with a special status of citation forms
Elena Savinova1, Svetlana Malyutina1; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics

C15_ Tracking the time-course of linguistic control mechanisms in the bilingual brain: An MEG study.
Polina Timofeeva 1, Amoruso, L.1, 2, Manuel Carreiras1, 2, 3; 1BCBL, 2Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 3University of the Basque Country

C16_ The problem of illusory power for imaginary statistical interactions
Dario Paape1, Shravan Vasishth1; 1University of Potsdam

C17_ How the Brain Processes Word Order in Japanese Sign Language: an fMRI Study
Jungho Kim1, Masatoshi Koizumi2, Shinichi Chigusa2, Noriaki Yusa3; 1Kyoto Women’s University, 2Tohoku University, 3Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University

C18_ Investigating Russian-English translation and word characteristics in verbal memory with machine-learning
Angela Medvedeva1, Alexandra Petrovskaya 2, Bogdan Kirillov3, Oleg Medvedev4, Anastasiya Asmolova2, Matteo Feurra2, Giulia Galli1; 1Kingston University, London, UK, 2National Research University Higher School of Economics, 3Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 4University of Waikato

C19_ Form, meaning, and morphology in Arabic masked priming: An ERP study
John Drury1, Eiman Mustafawi1, Tariq Khwaileh1, Ali Idrissi1; 1Qatar University

C20_ Attraction effect in the processing of number agreement in English as a second language
Hyenyeong, Chung1, Yunju, Nam1 & Upyoung, Hong1; 1Konkuk University

C21_ Ambiguity Resolution in Natural Reading
Anastasiia Kaprielova1, Anna Laurinavichyute1; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics

C22_ The role of gender-related cues in inflectional operations: A Rapid Event-related fMRI Study on Italian
Maria De Martino1, Andrea G. Russo1, Azzurra Mancuso1, Francesco Di Salle1,2, Annibale Elia1, Alessandro Laudanna1, Fabrizio Esposito1, 2; 1University of Salerno, 2University Hospital “San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi D’Aragona”

C23_ Standardized tools for exploring patterns of phonological development in Russian-speaking monolingual and bilingual preschoolers: the Russian version of the Speakaboo test
Victoria Reshetnikova1, Ekaterina Tomas1; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics

C24_ Tri-morphemic words in processing
Swetlana Schuster1, Sandra Kotzor 1,2, Aditi Lahiri1; 1University of Oxford, 2Oxford Brookes University

C25_ An ERPs study on the lexical markedness and the truth value in the Korean comparative sentences processing
Yunju Nam1, Upyong Hong1; 1Konkuk University

C26_ On the semantics-driven disambiguation in the processing of Korean comparative constructions
Kihyo Park1, Yunju Nam1, Upyong Hong1; 1Konkuk University

C27_ Two-stage operation of multi-level chunking in reading
Xing Tian1, Jinbiao Yang2, Qing Cai3, and Xing Tian1; 1NYU Shanghai, 2Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 3East China Normal University

C28_ Understanding lexicality mechanisms via trial-and-error word learning: MEG study
Boris Chernyshev 1,2,3, Alexandra Razorenova1,2, Anna Butorina1, Anastasia Nikolaeva1, Andrey Prokofyev1, Nikita Tyulenev1, Tatiana Stroganova1; 1Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 3Lomonosov Moscow State University

C29_ Processing Strategies in Language Acquisition
Julia Edeleva1,2; 1University of Münster, 2University of Braunschweig

C30_ Case form processing in sentential context: evidence from Russian
Daria Chernova1, Svetlana Alexeeva1, Natalia Slioussar, 2,1; 1St.Petersburg State University, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics

C31_ Dysfunctional profiles of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus in stroke survivors: Testing region-specific correlations with aphasic symptoms using predictive modelling
Matteo Ferrante1,2; 1University of Pavia, 2 University School for Advanced Studies

 

C32_ Complement Coercion in Mandarin Chinese: A Corpus-based Analysis
Yanan Sheng1, Yunyan DUAN2, Fuyun Wu3; 1Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, 2Northwestern University, 3Shanghai Jiaotong University

C33_ Effects of coherence relations on the interpretation of Korean null pronouns
Jina Song1, Elsi Kaiser1; 1University of Southern California

C34_ Effects of continuous simultaneous oral reproduction practice on L2 overall proficiency improvement: Perspectives from the Cognitive Load Theory
Yutaka Yamauchi1, Kayoko Ito2, Kay Husky3; 1Soka University, 2Koyasan University, 3Tokyo International University

C35_ Children’s use of tactile input when acquiring non-native phonological contrasts
Nuria Esteve Gibert1, María del Mar Suarez1, Raquel Serrano1, Sara Fejioo1, Olena Vasylets1; 1Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

C36_ Grammatical Factors in Morphological Processing: Evidence from Allomorphy
Daniil Bondarenko1, Onur Özsoy1, Itamar Kastner1; 1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin,

C37_ The expectation effect on sarcasm processing in reading
Olga Konstantinova1, Veronika Prokopenya1; 1St. Petersburg State University

C38_ L2 processing of case in Russian
Natalia Cherepovskaia1, Slioussar Natalia2,3, Denissenko Anna1; 1Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, 2National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Russia, 3Saint-Petersburg State University

C39_ Structural Priming in a Structurally Biased Language: Investigating Abstract Representations in Bilingual Children Compared to Monolingual Children over Development
Alina Kholodova1, Michelle Peter2, Caroline Rowland3, Shanley Allen1; 1University of Kaiserslautern, 2University of Liverpool, 3Max Plank Institute Nijmengen

C40_ Incremental processing of temporal quantification – evidence from self-paced reading and ERPs
Petra Augurzky1, Vera Hohaus2, Rolf Ulrich1; 1University of Tuebingen, 2University of Manchester

C41_ Processes involved in emotional regulation through Reformulation language: an ERP study
Katia Rolán González1, Enrique García-Marco2, David Beltrán2, Francisca Fariña1; 1Universidade de Vigo, 2Universidad de la Laguna

C42_ Olfactory meaning in love discourse
Nella Trofimova1; 1National Research University - Higher School of Economics

C43_ When the prominent patient meets the eye: Perceptual priming in context
Yvonne Portele1; 1Goethe University Frankfurt

C44_ Multiple-informant literacy evaluation of rural pupils at risk of developmental language disorder
Tatiana Logvinenko1, Daria Momotenko1; 1Saint Petersburg State University

C45_ The "swinging" effects of morphemic ambiguity in lexical processing: Evidence from Korean
Yoolim Kim1, Sandra Kotzor1, Aditi Lahiri1; 1University of Oxford

C46_ Structural priming is determined by global syntax rather than internal phrase structure: Evidence from young and older adults
Sophie M. Hardy1, Linda Wheeldon2, Katrien Segaert1; 1University of Birmingham, 2University of Agder

C47_ Background noise modifies moral decision making in an auditory setting
Susanne Brouwer1; 1Radboud University

C48_ Comprehension of subject- and object-relative clauses in Russian and German mono- and bilinguals
Viktoriia Kshniaskina1; 1University of Potsdam

C49_ Crosslinguistic influence in parafoveal semantic processing: A study investigating L1 English monolinguals and late L2-English/L1-German bilinguals
Leigh B. Fernandez1, Christoph Scheepers2, and Shanley E.M. Allen1; 1Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 2University of Glasgow

C50_ Does the experience of different language scripts influence performance in non-verbal cognitive tasks?
Lihua Xia1, Thomas H. Bak1, Antonella Sorace1, Mariana Vega-Mendoza2; 1University of Edinburgh 2Umeå University, Umeå

C51_ Multiword repetition disfluencies arise from cue competition
Zara Harmon1, Vsevolod Kapatsinski1; 1University of Oregon

C52_ The role of prosodic emphasis in speaker’s communicative intention and in listeners’ word prediction during spoken-language comprehension
Angèle Brunellière1, Laurence Delrue1; 1Université de Lille

C53_ Adults are not always faster than children. An eye-tracking study on the online comprehension of Indirect Scalar Implicatures
Maik Thalmann1, Daniele Panizza1; 1University of Göttingen

C54_ The effects of frequency of gender, declension and number on the acquisition of Accusative case in Russian-speaking children
Alexandra Shilkina1, Ekaterina Thomas1; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics

C55_ Can computers understand word meanings like the human brain does? Assessing the correlation between EEG responses and NLP-generated word similarity
Linmin Zhang1,2, Lingting Wang2,3, Jinbiao Yang4, Peng Qian5, Xuefei Wang6, Xipeng Qiu6, Zheng Zhang1,7, Xing Tian1,2; 1NYU Shanghai, 2NYU-ECNU Institute of Brain and Cognitive Science, 3East China Normal University, 4Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 5MIT, 6Fudan University, 7AWS Shanghai AI Lab

C56_ How we know factive verbs are islands: experimental evidence
David Potter1, Katy Carlson1; 1Morehead State University

C57_ Interference in presupposition resolution
Tijn Schmitz1, Jakub Dotlacil2, Rick Nouwen1; 1UiL OTS, 2ILLC

C58_ Breaking down breaking down: automatic decomposition revisited with MEG evidence from visual processing of circumfixes, infixes, and reduplication in Tagalog
Samantha Wray1, Linnaea Stockall2, Alec Marantz3; 1New York University Abu Dhabi, 2Queen Mary University of London, 3New York University

C59_ Code-switching from first to second language could reduce emotional reactivity to taboo words
Aleksandra Tomic1, Jorge Valdes Kroff1; 1University of Florida

C60_ Competition between local priming and global outcome in processing of negatives
Evgenii Kalenkovich1, Emily J. Darley2, Christopher Kent3, Nina Kazanina1,3; 1National Research University Higher School of Economics, 2University of Oxford, 3University of Bristol

C61_ Phrasal meaning composition in intensional contexts: Contrasting ERP effects of temporal and modal adjectives
Isabella Fritz1, Giosuè Baggio1; 1Norwegian University of Science and Technology

C62_ No effect of negation in counterfactuals: Evidence from the visual world paradigm
Isabel Orenes1, Juan Antonio Garcia-Madruga1, Orlando Espino2, Ruth Byrne3; 1Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, 2University of La Laguna, 3Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin

C63_ A cross-cultural distributional comparison of food words
Diego Frassinelli1, Gabriella Vigliocco2, Sebastian Padó1; 1University of Stuttgart, 2UCL

C64_ Pupil size reflects the time course of lexical access during production
Simone Sprenger1, Rahel Verbree1, Jacolien van Rij1; 1University of Groningen

C65_ The processing costs of subordinating conjunctions in Brazilian Portuguese: evidence from eye movement
Elisangela Nogueira Teixeira1, Antonio Ademilton Pinheiro Dantas1, Brenda Kessia Arruda de Souza1; 1Universidade Federal do Ceará

C66_ The word's sex: cognitive processing of grammatical gender by Russian monolinguals and Turkic-Russian bilinguals
Elena D. Nekrasova1, Valeria Paliy1, Zoya Rezanova1; 1National Research Tomsk State University

C67_ ‘Nonetheless’ can reverse predictions immediately: evidence from ERPs
Yana Arkhipova1, Thomas Sostarics2, Ryan Law1, Ming Xiang2 & Wing Yee Chow1; 1University College London, 2University of Chicago

C68_ Incidental learning of irrelevant information during reading acquisition

Jon Andoni Duñabeitia1, Aurore Zelazny2, Eloi Puig-Mayenco3, Aina Casaponsa4, Cristina Herranz5, Jason Rothman6 ; 1Nebrija University, 2Aalborg Universitet, 3Univeristy of Reading, 4Lancaster University, 5Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 6UiT The Arctic University of Norway

C69_Biliteracy advantage: learning novel written word-forms in native and second language scripts.

Grigory Kopytin1, Beatriz Bermúdez-Margaretto1, Andriy Myachykov1,2, Yury Shtyrov,1,3

1National Research University - Higher School of Economics, 2Northumbria University, 3Aarhus University

C70_The saliency of the mentioned argument facilitates the processing of negation: a Visual World study.

 

Marta Tagliani1, Chiara Melloni1, Denis Delfitto1, Daniele Panizza2, 1University of Verona, 2University of Göttingen

September 7th

 

 

9:00 – 9:30

HSE address

Vadim Radaev (Vice Chancellor, HSE)

9:30 – 10:30

Invited talk 3

Linda Wheeldon(Agder University, Norway)

Spoken sentence production: incremental planning for fluent output”

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee break

11:00 – 11:20

Talk D1

Phillip M. Alday1, Antje S. Meyer1,2; 1Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 2Radboud University

 “Conversation as a competitive sport”

11:2011:40

 

Talk D2

 

 

Nikolay Korotaev,1 Andrej A. Kibrik2,3, Olga Fedorova21Russian State University for the Humanities, 2Lomonosov Moscow State University, 3Institute of Linguistics RAS,

On temporal alignment between speech and manual gesticulation: two levels of coordination”

11:4012:00

 

Talk D3

 

Anna A. Ivanova1, Nikolay Korotaev2, Olga Fedorova3; 1MIT, 2Russian State University for the Humanities, 3Lomonosov Moscow State University

The language network is recruited but not required for non-verbal semantic processing”

12:0012:20

 

Talk D4

 

MaximUlanov1, YuryShtyrov, OlgaDragoy, SvetlanaMalyutina, AnnaPavlova, EkaterinaIskra, OlgaSoloukhina, OlgaBuivolova, VidyaSomashekarappa, AndreyProkofyev, MatteoFeurra, TatianaStroganova; 1NationalResearchUniversity- HigherSchoolofEconomics

Intensive language-action therapy combined with anodal tDCS leads to verb generation improvements in chronic non-fluent post-stroke aphasia”

12:20– 12:40

 

Talk D5

 

Alexandra Perovic1, Ken Wexler2; 1University College London, 2Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The effect of age on the comprehension of passives in Down syndrome and Williams syndrome”

 

12:40 – 14:30

 

Lunch & Poster session3

 

14:30 – 15:30

Invited talk 4

Antje Meyer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands and Radboud University, The Netherlands)

Why conversations are easy to hold and hard to study”

15:4016:00

Talk E1

 

Natalia Mitrofanova1, Marit Westergaard1,2; 1UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 2NTNU

Typological or structural transfer in L3 acquisition: Evidence from artificial language learning”

16:0016:20

Talk E2

 

Silvia Kim1, Elsi Kaiser1; 1University of Southern California

English-Korean code-switching: Looking beyond balanced bilinguals and beyond Indo-European”

16:2016:40

Talk E3

 

Kalinka Timmer1, Albert Costa1; 1Universitat Pompeu Fabra

How does language context modulate attention?”

16:40 – 17:00

Coffee break

17:0017:20

Talk E4

 

Iva Ivanova1, Dacia Hernandez1, Aziz Atiya1; 1University of Texas at El Paso

Lexical alignment in the two languages of bilinguals”

17:20 – 17:40

Talk E5

 

Michelle Toti1; 1Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele

Are you really cursing? Neural processing of taboo words in native and foreign language”

17:40 – 18:00

Talk E6

 

Wilhelmiina Toivo1, Christoph Scheepers1; 1University of Glasgow

Comparing methods of measuring reduced emotional resonance in bilinguals' second language”

19:00 - …

Boat Tour and Conference Dinner