• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Research&Expertise

Illustration for news: Foreign Languages Slow Down Brain Ageing

Foreign Languages Slow Down Brain Ageing

Medical advances are causing a gradual increase in average life expectancy. However, this comes at a price, as the number of cases of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases grows with age. Researchers from HSE University (Russia) and Northumbria University (UK) have found that bilingualism can slow down and mitigate the course of age-related changes in the human brain. The study was published in Frontiers in Psychology.

Illustration for news: Mine or Ours: The Brain’s Choice

Mine or Ours: The Brain’s Choice

Researchers from HSE University have shown how the brain works differently depending on whether a subject is dealing with common (shared) or private natural resources. The ventral striatum—the so-called pleasure centre—plays a significant role in this process. The study has been published by Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 

Illustration for news: Two Worlds of Residents: Car Owners Look at Shared Urban Courtyards Differently from Pedestrians

Two Worlds of Residents: Car Owners Look at Shared Urban Courtyards Differently from Pedestrians

Researchers from HSE University and St. Petersburg State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering (SPSUACE) used eye tracking to study how residents who own cars and those who don’t look at the shared courtyards of multistorey apartment buildings. The study was published in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.

Illustration for news: International Laboratory of Social Neurobiology to Look at How Fake News Affects Human Behaviour

International Laboratory of Social Neurobiology to Look at How Fake News Affects Human Behaviour

The mega-grant allocated by the Russian government to the International Laboratory of Social Neurobiology, has been extended for 2022-23. The laboratory was founded two years ago and is headed by Iiro Jaaskelainen, a leading neurobiologist from Finland. Laboratory Head Vasily Klucharev spoke to the HSE News Service about the results the lab has already achieved and the prospects for the next two years.

Illustration for news: Readiness to Punish Others for Selfish Behaviour Explained by Functional Brain Connections

Readiness to Punish Others for Selfish Behaviour Explained by Functional Brain Connections

The stronger the functional brain connections, the less inclined someone is to punish others for unfair behaviour. This conclusion was reached by HSE researchers following a neuroimaging experiment. Their paper ‘Wired to punish? Electroencephalographic study of the resting-state neuronal oscillations underlying third-party punishment’ was published in the journal Neuroscience.